Santorini olive carbon dating eruption

The discovery of an olive branch buried in volcanic ash for centuries is helping scientists pinpoint the date of one of the most powerful volcanic eruptions in the last 10,000 years.The finding could force archeologists to revise historical timelines for civilizations inhabiting the Mediterranean basin during the Late Bronze Age.The pair of studies appears in the 28 April issue of the journal , published by AAAS, the nonprofit science society.During the Late Bronze Age, large building complexes appeared on Crete and later on mainland Greece as part of the Minoan “New Palace” civilization.

The areas of the eastern Aegean and Minor Asia that were covered by thin ash and suffered from the volcanic winter of the following two years had serious problems of survival.The first, classical dating of the eruption was based upon comparative research of the potter technique and from Egyptian sources and was defined approximately in 1500 B. The absolute dating that we had until April 2006 was giving at least 100 to 150 years older age and derived from three different methods: the radiocarbon, the dendrochronology dating (measurement of the yearly augmentation layers of tree trunks that live many thousands of years) and the ice-core dating (determination of the past time through the measurement of the yearly augmentation layers of the ice). Under this estimation, the Minoan eruption of Santorini surpasses by far the one of the Tampora in 1815 (~50 km3) and it is now in the first place of volcano eruption magnitude of the last 10.000 years in the entire world.The recent radiocarbon dating (April 2006) of an olive tree branch that was buried under the ashes of the Minoan eruption, gave the age between 16 B. Santorini and the neighboring islands spread in 50-60 kilometers were completely destroyed.C., based on similarities between pottery shards found in Akrotiri, a town buried in ash by the blast, and pottery in Egypt from a period known as the New Kingdom.Radiocarbon experts, meanwhile, have consistently dated the event to about 100 years earlier.

Santorini olive carbon dating eruption